Homographs that’ll make your scratch your heads

Let’s face it – English is a crazy language. There is no ham in hamburger, no egg in eggplant, neither apple nor pine in pineapple. French fries weren’t invented in France, and English muffins weren’t invented in England. Furthermore, quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square and a guinea pig is not from Guinea nor is it a pig!

English is also a silly language at times, too. I mean, who in their right mind would create two words with the same spelling and different meanings? I am of course talking about those pesky homographs. For example:

“He wound up the clock with ease, even though he had a wound to his right hand.”

How ridiculous! Of course, you could, and probably would, rephrase that sentence to avoid the homographs. But there are times when we find ourselves accidentally sucked into the vacuum, and like a dog’s mess gracing the pavement of a dark lane, we occasionally step on a homograph-ridden sentence.

Now, before we dive into our list of homographs for your grammatical pleasure, bear in mind that a homograph that is also pronounced differently is called a ‘heteronym’. Oh, and while we’re here, don’t forget the ‘homophone’, which is when two or more words share the same pronunciation but have different meanings, and may or may not be spelled the same way.

And one last thing…

The homograph, heteronym and homophone are all types of ‘homonym’; which is defined as two or more words that share the same spelling, or the same pronunciation, or both, but have different meanings.

Confused? Don’t sweat it. Your friends will scratch their scalps too when you share these:

1. Rita was too close to the door to close it.
2. Dan’s wife said he should polish the Polish furniture on a regular basis.
3. I did not object to the object in question.
4. There is no time like the present to present a friend with a present.
5. The vegetable farm was asked to produce organic produce for the local community.
6. Unfortunately the insurance was invalid for the invalid.
7. The dog lead was dangerous because it was made of lead.
8. I had to hide the animal hide before my vegetarian friend came to dinner.
9. A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer pipeline.
10. There was a row between the oarsmen about how to row properly.
11. The wind was too strong to wind the sail.
12. She shed a tear upon seeing the tear in the painting.
13. The soldier had to desert his platoon in the desert.
14. I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.
15. The buck does get rather excited when the does are around.
16. The dump was so full it had to refuse more refuse.
17. To help plant the seeds the farmer taught his sow to sow.
18. The contract was subject to the term that I didn’t contract an illness within the first two months.
19. It took me a minute to locate the minute hole in the fence.
20. After months of procrastination, Helen decided to resume writing her resume.
21. I shall stop here because I am content with this content!

by Jennifer Frost

10 Words Brits Use That Americans No Longer Do

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A quick example of the bleeding obvious: people speak differently in the UK and the US. If you’re an American fan of British TV shows—the originals, not the American remakes—you’re probably very aware that once in a while, the characters will utter a word that you won’t hear on the streets of your hometown.

But you may be surprised to know that some of the words we consider distinctly British today were once fairly common in the United States. Read on:

1 Tetchy, adjective Someone who is tetchy is someone with a bad temper:
               You can’t even talk with him these days; he’s just too tetchy.

2 Amongst, preposition While amongst is less favored than among in British English, it’s rarely seen at all in American English.
               There’s a grammar pedant amongst us, and I intend to find out who he is.

3 Marvelous, adjective Sure, you can use amazing instead, but marvelous sounds so much more . . . marvelous:
               We had a marvelous time during that holiday retreat.

4 Fortnight, noun Something that happens once every fortnight is something that happens every two weeks:
                 We try to get together for a family meal once a fortnight.

5 Cheers, exclamation In British English, cheers isn’t something you’d say when it’s time to have a drink. It’s a casual way to say “thank you”:
              Cheers Thom, I really needed that paper today.

6 Rubbish, noun, adjective You know this one, it has the same meaning as garbage. Plus, rubbish can be used as an adjective when you want to say that something is really bad:
              I bought a new keyboard today, but it’s rubbish so I’ll give it to my brother.

7 Blimey, exclamation If you ever get tired of saying “wow,” you might make an effort to bring blimey back:
               Blimey, that escalated quickly!

8 Hoover, noun A hoover is a device that uses suction to clean surfaces—a vacuum cleaner:
               The hoover broke because it’s not supposed to be used to clean up spilled water.

9 Bespoke, adjective Before things were custom-made, they were bespoke, especially if they were suits:
               A bespoke suit is expensive, but it’s a good investment if you want to look professional.

10 Chap, noun Chap is an informal way of referring to a male person, sort of like “dude”:
                  See that chap wearing a yellow bow-tie? That’s my biology professor.

Techno CLIL for EVO

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CLIL – Content and Language Integrated Learning – is a “dual focus” methodology, fostering the development of language competences and the delivery of subject content at the same time. It referes to the learning of a curricular subject in a foreign language, with great advantages in terms of students’ learning outcomes and cognitive processesn. CLIL is spreading more and more, as an integrated part of school curricula in many countries. In order to implement this innovative approach, the role of teacher training is essential.

This EVO session is aimed at spreading CLIL methodology, combining teaching strategies and technical tools and eliciting reflections and discussions among teachers from all over the world. It is important to share good practices from the different countries and learn from other colleagues through synchronous and asynchronous web meetings.

The course consists of Webinars with national and international CLIL experts. To participate in these live events all you need is a pair of headphones with a microphone if you are going to intervene. The duration of the course is five weeks for a total of 50 hours and is recognized by #Miur.

Further, information will be provided before the start of the first lesson, however to stay updated and ask questions, participants are invited to join TECHNO-CLIL for EVO 2016 & 2017 Facebook group, which is administered by the teachers and researchers Daniela Cuccurullo and Letizia Cinganotto, who are also the organizers of the course.

 

Registration from January 1st :
  1. Go to: https://moodle4teachers.org/course/view.php?id=90
  2. Log in using your Gmail, Facebook, or LinkedIn accounts.
  3. Enrol in https://moodle4teachers.org/course/view.php?id=90

Thankful to be a Teacher

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November is rough in the classroom. I mean really rough. October was tough, but things just get rough in November. Every year I think it will be better, but every year it is rough. It is hard to remember during these times why you do what you do every day, but sometimes that is exactly what we need. When the going gets tough, I like to count my blessings. Today I bring to you, why I am thankful to be a teacher.

I Have Purpose

I don’t think that any teacher doubts that they have purpose, but I think sometimes we may take it for granted. There are a lot of people in the world who have no idea what they are doing on a day to day basis, but we, as teachers, have a defined purpose each and every day. Our students are what it is all about, and we certainly do our best to be our best for them.

I Have Community

All of my absolute best friends in the world are my teacher friends. From the teacher next door to the teacher I met online, and have never met in person, we are all friends. Teaching as a profession is like no other. We celebrate one another’s accomplishments and cry for one another when the going gets tough. We pull together to create the most amazing community of people, and for that I am ever grateful.

Continue reading “Thankful to be a Teacher”